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The Science Library is curated collection of topics that underpin and drive our work.

 

 

In this section we break down well known themes and articulate through our lens their importance to understanding people in the built environment.

This resource is to further knowledge for the curious and learn more about how we approach solving human related problems.

 
 
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SENSE OF PLACE & LANDMARKS

‘Sense of place’ is a phenomena comprised of the emotional connections one makes with a place, as well the values, cultural meanings and symbols attributed to a place, that are all continually formed and updated in the individual’s mind.

 
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CLIMATE CHANGE

Climate change is a long term trend that will affect human dynamics in cities. This is not a section on how to solve climate change, rather an understanding of how it affects people on a cognitive and physiological level.

 
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PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTORTIONS OF SPACE & TIME

There is a difference between perceived and actual space and time measures. There are general factors that distort our estimation of distance and space: number of turns, density of structures in environment, familiarity of environment, attention and visual & dynamic cues (optic flow).

 
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AUTOMATION AND HUMAN COMMUNICATION

Automation refers to the use or introduction of automatic equipment, such as robots, machines, or computers into the workforce, with the objective of reducing waste, increasing repetitions of a task, and saving money. However, what is the human consequence?

 
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NAVIGATION & MEMORY

Our ability to navigate and what the underlying neural substrates enabling this function has been an area of considerable research within the field of cognitive neuroscience.

 
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URBAN SPRAWL

What are the unintended human consequences of urban sprawl? Defined as the uncoordinated growth of a community, usually away from an urban centre into outlying areas.

 
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OBJECT RECOGNITION

As we exist, incoming external information from the world is extracted and processed by our sensory modalities. As this occurs, we begin to rapidly create top-down predictions of the environment based on associative connections drawn from our long-term memory of past-experiences. This helps us make sense of and interact with the world, guiding our cognition and behaviour.

 
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TECHNOLOGY

Digital devices are a technology that accesses media and information; laptops, smartphones, tablets, televisions and computer screens. The devices are catalysing and affording a new culture of high information consumption.

 
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NEURODIVERSITY

Neurodiversity is a movement that emerged from the work of Judy Singer, a sociologist and a person on the autistic spectrum. She proposed that people who are “neurologically different represent a new addition to the familiar political categories of class, gender, and race.”

 
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POVERTY, HOMELESSNESS & PTSD

Poverty and homelessness are culturally perceived through the lenses of economics and politics. However, as neuroscience advances, we are starting to understand that there is a crucial biological aspect to poverty. This evidence will allow us to understand the long term mental and physical health implications of poverty and homelessness.

 
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INFRASTRUCTURE & INEQUALITY

The distribution of urban infrastructure leads to inequality of experience in cities. Often resulting in environmental racism as certain communities face the pollution and stressor consequences of unnecessary movements.

 
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WELLBEING & STRESS

At Centric Lab we define ‘wellbeing’ as a constantly adaptive process by which we aim to reach physical and mental homeostasis or equilibrium. Homeostasis is maintained by using mental, social and physical resources to react to mental, social, and physical challenges presented to us by our environment.

*Please note that information here is not consultancy or direct advice and should be only seen as insights into our work.